calla lilies leaves turning yellow

Calla Lilies Leaves Turning Yellow: 4 Causes, Solutions & Best Care Tips

Calla lilies are a popular choice for gardeners and florists, prized for their striking blooms and elegant form. However, yellowing leaves can be a common problem for these plants, and can be a sign of a number of underlying issues.

Understanding calla lilies leaves turning yellow and how to address them is key to keeping your calla lilies healthy and vibrant.

There are a variety of factors that can cause calla lily leaves to turn yellow, including nutrient deficiencies, over or under-watering, pests and diseases, and improper care.

In some cases, yellowing leaves may be a natural part of the plant’s growth cycle, particularly during the dormant season. However, in most cases, yellowing leaves are a sign of stress or damage to the plant, and should be addressed promptly to prevent further damage.

Key Takeaways:

  • Yellowing leaves are a common problem for calla lilies, and can be caused by a variety of factors including nutrient deficiencies, improper care, pests and diseases, and natural growth cycles.
  • Understanding the role of soil, watering, and fertilization is key to preventing yellowing leaves and promoting healthy growth.
  • Regular monitoring and prompt action can help prevent further damage to the plant and maintain its overall health.

Related posts:

Understanding Calla Lilies

calla lilies turning yellow

Calla lilies, also known by their scientific name Zantedeschia, are native to South Africa. They are perennial plants that grow from rhizomes and produce beautiful flowers that come in a variety of colors such as white, pink, yellow, and purple.

Calla lilies are easy to grow and require minimal maintenance, making them a popular choice for gardeners and florists alike.

One of the common issues that gardeners face with calla lilies is when their leaves turn yellow. This can be a sign of a number of problems, including overwatering, underwatering, nutrient deficiencies, diseases, pests, sunlight issues, lack of drainage, or simply the natural aging process of the plant.

To prevent yellowing of the leaves, it is important to understand the growing conditions that calla lilies require. They prefer well-draining soil that is rich in organic matter and should be watered regularly but not excessively. Calla lilies also require adequate sunlight, but too much direct sunlight can cause the leaves to burn.

If yellowing of the leaves does occur, it is important to identify the underlying cause and take appropriate measures to address it. This may involve adjusting the watering schedule, adding fertilizer, treating the plant for pests or diseases, or providing more or less sunlight.

Calla Lilies Leaves Turning Yellow

Calla lilies are known for their beautiful and vibrant blooms, but when their leaves start to turn yellow, it can be a sign that something is wrong. Here are some of the common causes for yellowing leaves in calla lilies:

1. Overwatering and Underwatering

Overwatering can lead to excessive moisture in the soil, which can cause the roots to rot and prevent the plant from absorbing nutrients. Underwatering, on the other hand, can cause the leaves to wilt and turn yellow. It is important to find a balance and ensure that the soil is moist but not waterlogged.

2. Temperature and Environmental Stress

Calla lilies prefer temperatures between 60 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit. If the temperature is too high or too low, it can cause the leaves to turn yellow. Environmental stressors such as high winds, low humidity, or direct sunlight can also cause yellowing leaves.

3. Nutrient Deficiencies

pexels sippakorn yamkasikorn 3696170 3

Yellowing leaves, known as chlorosis, can be caused by a nutrient deficiency in the soil. Calla lilies require nitrogen, zinc, iron, and other trace elements to thrive. If the soil is lacking these nutrients, the leaves may turn yellow. Using a balanced fertilizer can help prevent nutrient deficiencies.

4. Pests and Diseases

Pests such as spider mites, aphids, caterpillars, snails, and slugs can damage the leaves of calla lilies and cause them to turn yellow. Fungal diseases such as bacterial soft rot can also cause yellowing leaves. It is important to inspect the plant regularly and treat any pest infestations or diseases promptly.

Role of Soil in Plant Health

Soil Type and pH

The type of soil and its pH play a crucial role in the overall health of calla lilies. Calla lilies thrive in well-drained soil that is rich in organic matter. Soil that is too compact or has poor drainage can lead to root damage and root rot, which can cause the leaves to turn yellow.

The pH level of the soil is also important for the health of calla lilies. Calla lilies prefer slightly acidic soil with a pH range of 6.0 to 6.5. If the soil is too acidic or too alkaline, it can affect the plant’s ability to absorb nutrients and lead to yellowing leaves.

It is recommended to test the soil’s pH level using a soil test kit before planting calla lilies.

Drainage and Moisture Control

Proper drainage and moisture control are essential for the health of calla lilies. Calla lilies require moist soil, but they do not tolerate standing water. If the soil is too wet, it can lead to root rot and yellowing leaves.

To improve drainage, calla lilies can be planted in raised beds or containers filled with well-drained soil. Adding mulch to the soil can also help retain moisture and prevent the soil from drying out too quickly. It is important to avoid overwatering calla lilies and to allow the soil to dry out slightly between waterings.

Correct Watering Practices for Calla Lilies

shutterstock 583764094 1

Calla lilies require proper watering practices to keep their leaves healthy and green. Overwatering or underwatering can cause the leaves to turn yellow and wilt. Here are some tips for correct watering practices for calla lilies:

1. Check the Soil Moisture

Before watering the plant, it is essential to check the soil’s moisture level. Stick your finger into the soil about an inch deep to determine if it is dry or moist. If the soil is still moist, wait a few days before watering. Overwatering can cause root rot and lead to yellowing leaves.

2. Watering Frequency

Calla lilies require regular watering, especially during the growing season. Water the plant when the top inch of soil feels dry to the touch. In hot weather, the plant may require watering more frequently. However, be careful not to overwater the plant, as it can lead to yellowing leaves.

3. Watering Method

Water the plant thoroughly until water starts to drain out of the bottom of the pot. Discard any excess water in the saucer to avoid waterlogging the plant. Avoid watering the leaves directly, as it can cause fungal diseases.

4. Avoid Overwatering

Overwatering can cause the plant to develop root rot, which can lead to yellowing leaves. If the leaves are turning yellow and the soil is still moist, it is a sign of overwatering. Reduce watering frequency and allow the soil to dry out between watering.

5. Avoid Underwatering

Underwatering can cause the plant to wilt and the leaves to turn yellow. If the soil is dry and the leaves are wilting, it is a sign of underwatering. Water the plant thoroughly and increase watering frequency to keep the soil moist.

By following these simple watering practices, calla lilies can thrive and produce healthy green leaves.

Effective Fertilization and Nutrition

pexels antony trivet 12925598 2

Calla lilies require adequate nutrition to thrive and produce healthy foliage and blooms. Yellowing leaves in calla lilies may be a sign of nutrient deficiencies in the soil, such as nitrogen, iron, zinc, or other trace elements. Therefore, it is important to provide balanced fertilization to ensure the plant receives the necessary nutrients.

One effective way to fertilize calla lilies is to use all-purpose organic fertilizer. Slow-release pelleted chicken manure is a good option to provide a range of nutrients and to feed the soil bacteria and worms. It is recommended to add the fertilizer in fall and spring to ensure the plant receives adequate nutrition throughout the growing season.

In addition to all-purpose organic fertilizer, it is also important to provide specific nutrients that calla lilies require. For example, iron chelates can be added to the soil to provide iron, which is essential for the production of chlorophyll and photosynthesis.

Potassium and magnesium are also important nutrients that calla lilies require to produce healthy foliage and blooms.

It is important to note that over-fertilization can also cause yellowing leaves in calla lilies. Therefore, it is recommended to follow the instructions on the fertilizer package and avoid applying too much fertilizer. It is also important to water the plant adequately after applying fertilizer to prevent fertilizer burn.

Dealing with Pests and Diseases

Yellowing leaves in calla lilies can also be caused by pests and diseases. Common pests that can infest calla lilies include spider mites, aphids, caterpillars, snails, and slugs. These pests can cause damage to the leaves and stems of the plant, leading to yellowing and wilting.

If you suspect a pest infestation, it is important to identify the pest and choose an appropriate treatment. Insecticidal soap and neem oil are effective treatments for many common pests that infest calla lilies. These treatments can be applied directly to the affected leaves and stems to kill the pests and prevent further damage.

Fungal diseases can also cause yellowing leaves in calla lilies. Bacterial soft rot is a common fungal disease that affects the roots and leaves of calla lilies. This disease can cause the leaves to yellow and wilt, and can eventually kill the entire plant.

Prevention is key when it comes to fungal diseases. Proper watering practices, good air circulation, and avoiding over-fertilization can all help prevent fungal diseases from taking hold. If you suspect a fungal disease, a fungicide may be necessary to treat the affected plant.

When dealing with pests and diseases, it is important to choose treatments that are safe for both the plant and the environment. Avoid using harsh pesticides or chemicals that can harm beneficial insects and pollinators. Instead, choose organic treatments that are safe and effective.

The Impact of Transplantation and Repotting

Begonia Maculata Propagation

Transplantation and repotting can have a significant impact on the health of calla lilies, including causing the leaves to turn yellow. When a calla lily is transplanted or repotted, it can experience stress that may affect its ability to absorb nutrients and water, leading to yellowing leaves.

1. Transplantation

Transplanting a calla lily involves moving it from one location to another, either within the garden or from a pot to the ground. This process can cause root damage, which can lead to yellowing leaves. When the roots are damaged, they cannot absorb nutrients and water properly, which can cause the leaves to turn yellow.

2. Repotting

Repotting a calla lily involves moving it from one pot to another, either because it has outgrown its current pot or because the soil has become depleted of nutrients. Repotting can also cause stress and lead to yellowing leaves. When a calla lily is repotted, it can experience transplant shock, which can cause the leaves to turn yellow.

3. Repotting Stress

Repotting stress can occur when a calla lily is moved to a new pot with fresh soil. The new soil may have different nutrient levels, pH levels, and drainage properties than the old soil, which can cause stress to the plant. This stress can lead to yellowing leaves, as the plant struggles to adapt to its new environment.

4. Transplant Shock

Transplant shock can occur when a calla lily is moved from one location to another, either within the garden or from a pot to the ground. This shock can cause the plant to lose its leaves, turn yellow, and even die.

To avoid transplant shock, it is important to prepare the new location or pot ahead of time and to water the plant thoroughly after transplanting.

5. Pots

The type of pot used to grow a calla lily can also impact its health. If a pot is too small, the plant’s roots may become crowded, which can lead to yellowing leaves. If a pot does not have proper drainage, the soil can become waterlogged, which can also cause yellowing leaves.

6. Root Damage

Root damage can occur during transplantation or repotting, as well as from overwatering or pests. When the roots are damaged, the plant cannot absorb nutrients and water properly, which can cause yellowing leaves. It is important to handle the roots carefully during transplantation and repotting and to avoid overwatering the plant.

Proper Care for Indoor Calla Lilies

shutterstock 619530314 3

Calla lilies are a popular indoor plant that can brighten up any room. However, they require proper care to keep them healthy and prevent yellowing leaves. In this section, we will discuss the necessary care for indoor calla lilies.

1. Temperature

Calla lilies prefer temperatures between 60-75°F (15-24°C). They can tolerate slightly cooler temperatures but should be kept away from drafts and cold air. Avoid placing them near air conditioning units or open windows during the winter months.

2. Watering

Proper watering is crucial for indoor calla lilies. Water the plant when the top inch of soil is dry to the touch. Overwatering can lead to root rot, which can cause the leaves to turn yellow. Make sure the pot has proper drainage and remove any excess water from the saucer.

3. Fertilizer

Indoor calla lilies should be fertilized every 2-3 weeks during the growing season. Use a balanced fertilizer with an NPK ratio of 10-10-10. Avoid over-fertilizing, as this can lead to yellowing leaves and other issues.

4. Pests and Diseases

Common pests that can affect indoor calla lilies include spider mites, mealybugs, and aphids. Regularly check the plant for signs of infestation and treat with insecticidal soap if necessary. Diseases such as fungal leaf spot can also cause yellowing leaves. Remove any infected leaves and treat the plant with a fungicide.

6. Transplantation and Repotting

Indoor calla lilies should be transplanted every 2-3 years. Choose a pot that is one size larger than the current pot and use a well-draining potting mix. Repotting should be done in the spring before the growing season begins.

Seasonal Care for Calla Lilies

shutterstock 1721433436 1 2

Calla lilies are a popular choice for gardeners who are looking to add a touch of elegance to their garden or home. These beautiful plants require proper care and attention, especially during the different seasons of the year. Here is a guide to seasonal care for calla lilies.

1. Summer Care

During the summer months, calla lilies require plenty of water to thrive. Make sure to keep the soil moist, but not waterlogged. If the soil is too dry, the leaves may turn yellow and the plant may wilt.

Calla lilies also prefer full sun to partial shade during the summer. If the plant is in full sun, make sure to provide some shade during the hottest part of the day to prevent sunburn.

2. Winter Care

In the winter, calla lilies go dormant and require less water. Allow the soil to dry out slightly between watering to prevent root rot. Calla lilies also prefer cooler temperatures during the winter months.

If the plant is indoors, keep it in a cool room with temperatures between 50-60°F. If the plant is outdoors, make sure to protect it from frost by covering it with a frost cloth or moving it indoors.

3. Pruning

Calla lilies do not require much pruning, but it is important to remove any dead or yellowing leaves to promote healthy growth. Use a sharp pair of scissors or pruning shears to cut the leaves at the base of the plant. Do not cut the leaves too close to the plant, as this may damage the stem.

4. Moisture

Calla lilies require consistent moisture to thrive. During the growing season, water the plant regularly to keep the soil moist. In the winter, allow the soil to dry out slightly between watering to prevent root rot. If the plant is in a container, make sure it has proper drainage to prevent water from collecting in the bottom of the pot.

5. Temperature

Calla lilies prefer cooler temperatures during the winter months and warmer temperatures during the summer. If the plant is indoors, keep it in a room with temperatures between 60-75°F. If the plant is outdoors, make sure to protect it from frost by covering it with a frost cloth or moving it indoors.

6. Sunlight

Calla lilies prefer full sun to partial shade during the growing season. If the plant is in full sun, make sure to provide some shade during the hottest part of the day to prevent sunburn. In the winter, calla lilies prefer indirect sunlight to prevent leaf burn. If the plant is indoors, place it near a window that receives bright, indirect sunlight.

Frequently Asked Questions

calla lily gf0e744f61 640

Should I remove yellow leaves from my calla lily?

Yes, you should remove yellow leaves from your calla lily plant. Yellow leaves are a sign of stress or disease, and removing them can help the plant focus its energy on healthy leaves and new growth.

Why are my outdoor lily leaves turning yellow?

Outdoor lily leaves can turn yellow due to a variety of reasons, including overwatering, underwatering, nutrient deficiencies, pests, or disease. It’s important to identify the underlying cause and address it accordingly.

Why are my calla lily leaves turning brown?

Calla lily leaves can turn brown due to overwatering, underwatering, or exposure to extreme temperatures or direct sunlight. Brown leaves can also be a sign of fungal or bacterial disease.

What to do when calla lily leaves turn yellow?

When calla lily leaves turn yellow, it’s important to identify the underlying cause and address it accordingly. This may involve adjusting watering habits, fertilizing the soil, treating pests or disease, or repotting the plant.

What causes canna lily leaves to turn yellow?

Canna lily leaves can turn yellow due to overwatering, underwatering, nutrient deficiencies, pests, or disease. It’s important to identify the underlying cause and address it accordingly.

How do you revive a dying calla lily?

To revive a dying calla lily, it’s important to identify the underlying cause of stress or disease and address it accordingly. This may involve adjusting watering habits, repotting the plant, treating pests or disease, or providing additional nutrients.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *